ProPowerLINKS

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The link between college and corporate

Posted on July 30, 2011 by Alan

Dear Brothers,

Thank you to those who attended my seminar! I hope it was helpful for you and your chapter and want to give you even more! Continue reading »


Posted on July 11, 2011 by Alan

Name
Street Address
City, State Zip-code
Phone Number
Email

REFERENCES:

Name
Position
Company
Street Address
City, State Zip-code
Office Number
Office/Professional Email
Relationship to you: (Teacher, previous employer, intern director)

Name
Position
Company
Street Address
City, State Zip-code
Office Number
Office/Professional Email
Relationship to you: (Teacher, previous employer, intern director)

Name
Position
Company
Street Address
City, State Zip-code
Office Number
Office/Professional Email
Relationship to you: (Teacher, previous employer, intern director)

Name
Position
Company
Street Address
City, State Zip-code
Office Number
Office/Professional Email
Relationship to you: (Teacher, previous employer, intern director)

Note: you should have 3-5 references listed. Make sure you contact each professional you have listed as a reference to let them know they might be contacted by your potential employer(s). Make sure you give them your resume and let them know when you are applying to a company with a description of the position you are applying for so they are prepared to talk about you!


Posted on July 11, 2011 by Alan

Contact Information
Name: First, Last
Street Address
City, State, Zip
Phone (Cell/Home)
Email Address

Objective: : This section should be a sentence or two about your employment goals. A customized objective statement that aligns your career goals to the position you are applying for will help your resume stand out from the competition.

Continue reading »


Posted on July 11, 2011 by Alan

Name
Address
City, State, Zip Code
Phone Number
Email Address

Date

Employer Contact Information
Name
Title
Company
Address
City, State, Zip Code

Salutation
Dear Mr. or Ms. Last Name, (if you do not have a specific contact, address the department/company)

Body of Cover Letter
The body of your cover letter lets the employer know what position you are applying for, why the employer should select you for an interview, and how you will follow-up.

First Paragraph
The first paragraph of your letter should include information on why you are interested the company’s position. Mention the position you are applying specifically and how you found out about the opportunity. If you know someone with the company you’re applying to, reference them and explain their relationship to you.

Middle Paragraph(s)
The next section of your cover letter should explain why you are a great candidate for the position. Mention specifically how your qualifications (skills, education, abilities, experience) match the position you are applying for. Remember, you are explaining your resume in more detail, not repeating it.

Final Paragraph
Conclude your cover letter by thanking the employer for considering you for the position. Include information on how you will follow-up.

Complimentary Close: (Sincerely, Respectfully yours,)

Signature: Handwritten Signature (for a mailed letter), Typed Signature


Posted on June 30, 2011 by Alan

Nothing can ruin your chances in getting your dream job like clamming up, giving confusing answers, uncontrolled nervousness, or sweating profusely during an interview. Controlling your nerves is not difficult but requires some preparation.

In many ways, the nervousness we all we experience before a job interview is similar to how we might feel before getting on stage to give a speech in front of an audience. What sets and interview apart from giving a speech is that an interview is usually one-on-one.

Here are some time-honored tips on staying relaxed before and during an interview:

● Take several deep breaths prior to an interview. Breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. Repeating this simple breathing exercise will help you stay calm and focus your mind on the interview ahead.
● Practice answering some interview questions as preparation for the actual day of the interview. Check the internet for sample interview questions.
● Show up to the interview in proper attire. You are going to feel nervous when you are in doubt about the professional appearance of your clothing so plan days prior on what to wear.
● Plan to arrive early. It is nerve wrecking when you are running late for an interview. Check the address of the place, name of the contact person, etc.
● During the interview, do not try to answer quickly, instead, pace yourself correctly before answering a question. Answer them directly and do not ramble on! This is the fastest way to annoy the interviewer. At the end of your interview, you may ask if they would like you to expand any of your answers.


Posted on June 30, 2011 by Alan

Being able to communicate effectively especially in front of an audience is a tremendous edge in today’s business arena. There is no shortcut to becoming confident in the art of public speaking except to practice, practice and practice more. The more you do it, the less anxiety you will have it will build your confidence.

People’s reactions, especially when making an important point, are excellent indicators that tell if you are convincing enough for them to become interested in what you are saying. Essentially, as long as you are getting a reaction from your audience – you are in charge.

Try these simple tips to help you achieve confidence in public speaking:

● Take advantage of opportunities to speak in public. Start with small successful speeches and as your nerves begin to quiet down, move to speeches that require preparation.
● Always prepare your materials prior to a speaking engagement. In situations where you will be asked to speak impromptu, the first thing to do is to try to control your nerves with some deep breathing exercises. Breathe slowly starting with the inhalation through the nose and finishing with the exhalation from the mouth.
● No one in the audience really knows how nervous you are. So, try to act more confidently even if you are “shaking like a leaf” internally. Smile and maintain correct posture.
● One of the most common mistakes people make is speaking to quickly that your listeners don’t have time understanding you. This pace is mainly due to nervousness, the more you can stay calm and collected the slower and relaxed your pace will be.
● Think about the tone and volume of your voice. A good way to monitor this is to record your voice and listen to it. When speaking in public, do not allow your voice to become monotonous and do not speak too low. If your voice is naturally low, using a microphone will help with the volume. If your voice is too high, you will be able to tell by the reaction of your audience.

Remember, just like any art form, the art of public speaking is not perfected overnight but requires plenty of practice and dedication.


Posted on June 30, 2011 by Alan

If your resume doesn’t jump out at potential employers, it will never be read. Poorly constructed resumes will never get the attention while professionally composed ones will go very far in the hands of prospective employers and ultimately, will get you the interview and possibly the job.

First, let us look at the things to avoid when creating professional resumes.

• Avoid typos, grammatical errors, and incorrect spellings.
• Avoid using personal pronouns such as “I” and “me.”
• Avoid using expansive sentences, it is better to write concise sentences in bullet points.
• Do not include past jobs that are irrelevant to the job you are applying for.
• Double-check for names that might sound either feminine or masculine and use applicable salutation. For example, use Mr. for men and Mrs. For married women, use Miss if she is not married, and Ms. if she is divorced or you just don’t know her marital status.

Note: Always remember that a recruiter or employer will spend no more than 20-25 seconds to screen resumes and decide whether to proceed and read thoroughly.

Now that you have clear ideas on what not to include in your resume, here are the top items to include in creating professional resumes:

• Include accurate contact information including street address, email and telephone numbers. This may sound elementary but often overlooked.
• The next item is to include your objective statement. Summarize a short statement stating the career you are interested in and the type of position you are seeking.
• Include your professional work experience in either chronological, functional or combination style.
• Educational background should include educational achievements and if you are a recent graduate, include your degree(s).
• List awards and achievements that are relevant to the position you are seeking.
• It is a good idea to include your activities and interests to give an employer some insight about your character.
• Remember to always send a cover letter and list of references with your resume when possible. This shows initiative on your part.


Posted on June 30, 2011 by Alan

How do you write emails that stand out from thousands of others? An email says a lot about you; learn to write them effectively. The number of emails we receive daily is overwhelming and unless an email catches our attention, chances are we will never read them.

Here are ten essential tips on how to write professional emails:

1. Begin your email with a greeting. Example: Dear, Hello, Good afternoon, etc.

2. Make sure that the subject line refers to the topic of your email. We tend to read the subject line first and if it is not specific, we usually never read it again or it gets placed in a folder the reader never gets to.

3. Start your email with a salutation. I have seen emails with no salutation and it looks unprofessional and insincere. What works in business or personal letters will work in emails.

4. Never start your message with an ambiguous agenda. Specify what it is that you are trying to accomplish within the email. For instance, I am writing to you about a project…you should identify which project and not use something broad.

5. Professional writing discourages the use of jargons, acronyms, or abbreviations only you can understand. The same applies for email writing. Nowadays, emails have a global reach. What maybe easily understood in the U.S. may not be the case in foreign countries and or people from different cultural backgrounds than you.

6. When attaching large files, make sure you highlight the important parts of the document(s) so the reader does not have to search for it. Another strategy is to copy and paste the important aspects of the document without sending the entire thing as an attachment.

7. Discuss as much as you can why you are sending a person an email. This should be addressed early in your email.

8. Do not forget to sign your email. Signatures like “Thank You,” and “Sincerely” are classic examples and are always professional.

9. Proofread your message before sending. Many people tend to write emails without observing proper punctuation and capitalization.

10. Use spell check before sending your message out.


Posted on June 16, 2011 by Alan

Having good table manners in today’s high-powered business world gives you an edge over your competition.

A decade ago, upcoming executives were expected to bring table manners to work with them. Today, because of overwhelming obligations between work and family, dining etiquettes are no longer practiced on a daily basis. As such, companies are paying top-dollar for their young executives to have lessons on table etiquette before sending them as representatives of the company.

Here are some dining etiquette tips that can help you conduct a successful business lunch or dinner anywhere in the world:

• The first rule in dining etiquette is to arrive on time and you should aim to be ten minutes early. Make sure to call ahead to inform your host or guest if you are going to be late.
• Never place bags, briefcases, phones, or personal effects on the table.
• Most restaurants have designated areas where you can temporarily deposit them while you are dining. Set laptops on the table neatly if they are needed for the meeting.
• Once seated, unfold the table napkin and place it on your lap. If you have to use the restroom, politely excuse yourself and simply leave the napkin on your chair and push the chair back under the table. At the end of the meal, place the table napkin on the place setting.
• Make sure to introduce the persons seated at the table if you brought them. If you do not know the people sitting next to you, you may introduce yourself if the host has not done so already.
• Remember to always stand up when you are seated but about to meet someone.
• Give suggestions to your client of what he or she may order from the menu.
• Note that the woman sitting to the right of the host is served first, then the other women in a clockwise manner. The men are served last.
• Always pass the salt and peppershaker together.
• Never monopolize the conversation
• Finalizing on a business deal should never be your only focus. Everyone should contribute to the conversation with lighter topics.


Posted on April 26, 2011 by Alan

Definition: A resume is a brief highlight of your work or activity experiences, educational background and skills as they relate to the type of job you are seeking.

Goal: To gain attention, arouse interest and generate action (an interview).

Must Include:

Heading: Name, email address, contact number, address (if necessary)

    Make sure this information is organized and centered at the top of your resume

Objective Statement: This should specific to the company/job you are seeking

    Companies do not want to see generic objective statements

Education: School, Degree(s), Major/Minor, GPA

    Include GPA if it is above a 3.0

Experience: Most important part of a resume!

    Put most relevant experience first as it pertains to the position being sought

Awards: List academic awards first, then non-academic

    List in order of most relevant to the position you are seeking

Interests: List your hobbies, hidden talents, etc.

    This is for your audience to get to know you on a more personal level

Advice:
Never exceed a one page resume!

    Most recruiters will through out resumes that exceed one page

Use action verbs

    “Created a new marketing plan for company XYZ”

Use Numbers/Figures

    “Sold over $10,000 worth of merchandise increasing sales by 15%”

Explain How you did it, not just what you did

    “Trained sales team through seminars, videos, and mock sales calls

Analogy: A resume is like a movie trailer. The length of a movie trailer and the length of time a recruiter views a resume is about the same. In many cases, recruiters spend even less time reviewing resumes. So, if you don’t grab the attention of the audience in seconds, you will be forgotten.

Remember, the sole purpose of a resume is to get you an interview!